Hail to the Chief

Something for the weekend.  Hail to the Chief.  The Presidential anthem, it was written by James Sanderson in 1812 and became associated with the Presidency in 1815 to honor George Washington and the ending of the War of 1812.  Andrew Jackson was the first living president for which the song was played.  During the Civil War it was played for both Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis.  Chester A. Arthur did not like the song and had John Philip Sousa write a replacement, the Presidential Polonaise.  After Arthur’s term of office the Marine Corps Band went right back to playing Hail to the Chief to announce the President.  The song is preceded by four ruffles and flourishes, the highest of musical honors, for the President.  Here are the almost never sung, thank goodness, lyrics:

 

Hail to the Chief we have chosen for the nation,
Hail to the Chief! We salute him, one and all.
Hail to the Chief, as we pledge cooperation
In proud fulfillment of a great, noble call.

Yours is the aim to make this grand country grander,
This you will do, that’s our strong, firm belief.
Hail to the one we selected as commander,
Hail to the President! Hail to the Chief! (more…)

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Published in: on February 17, 2018 at 5:30 am  Leave a Comment  
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K-K-K-K-Katy

Something for the weekend.  KK-K-K-Katy, one of the more popular songs of 1918.  Our times do not have a monopoly on silly music. Kids were still singing this in the Sixties when I was growing up.

 

 

Published in: on February 3, 2018 at 5:50 am  Leave a Comment  
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Going Home

 

Something for the weekend, Going Home sung by Sissel Kyrkjebø.  The music of the song was taken from Dvorak’s New World Symphony.  The lyrics were written in 1922 by Dvorak’s pupil William Ames Fisher.

 

Published in: on January 20, 2018 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Going Home  
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We Three Kings of Orient Are

 

Something for the weekend.  We Three Kings Of Orient Are.  Written in 1857 for a Christmas pageant his nieces and nephews were appearing in, this hymn written by John Henry Hopkins, Jr., an Episcopalian deacon, did not see print until 1863 in the midst of the Civil War and immediately struck a chord with the American people.  Since then, year in and year out, it has remained one of the favorite American Christmas hymns. (more…)

Published in: on December 23, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on We Three Kings of Orient Are  
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Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer

Something for the weekend.  Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer sung by Gene Autry.  Rudolph first appeared in a coloring book written and drawn by Robert L. May in 1939 as a Christmas giveaway by Montgomery Ward.  The tale of Rudoplph proved immensely popular with kids, with the coloring book still being in print and sold more than seven decades latter.  The famous song was written by Johnny Marks, a song writer and world war 2 combat veteran.  It was first sung by Harry Brannon in November 1949, shortly before the singing cowboy, Gene Autry, performed his immortal rendition. (more…)

Published in: on December 9, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer  
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Hark the Herald Angels Sing

Something for an Advent weekend.   Hark the Herald Angels Sing.  Written by Charles Wesley in 1739, the hymn we enjoy today developed and changed over a century with input from many hands.  No hymn I think better exemplifies the sheer joy that the coming of Christ should awake in the hearts of all Christians.

 

(more…)

Published in: on December 2, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Hark the Herald Angels Sing  
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That Old Black Magic

Something for the weekend.  The incomparable Ella Fitzgerald singing That Old Black Magic, which was written in 1942 by Johnny Mercer, with music by Harold Arlen, and which seems appropriate on this pre-Halloween weekend.

 

 

 

 

 

It was initially performed by Glenn Miller:

Published in: on October 28, 2017 at 3:30 am  Comments Off on That Old Black Magic  
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Of Rainy Days and Mondays

 

 

 

 

Something for the weekend.  Rainy Days and Mondays (1971).  Lots of rain here in Central Illinois this week as October comes in quite wet.  The Carpenters, siblings Richard and Karen, recorded this song in 1971, and it was their fourth number one song.  Actually I rather like rainy days and Mondays are great for me, as any trouble they bring can be written off since it is a Monday and the start of the work week for most, and therefore comes predestroyed as it were.  I always enjoyed Karen Carpenter’s voice and thus was saddened when in 1983 she died of anorexia nervosa and the details of her often sad life came out.  However her art remains and that is not a bad legacy for any artist.

Published in: on October 14, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Of Rainy Days and Mondays  
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Conquest of Paradise

 

Something for the weekend.  The song Conquest of Paradise from the movie 1492: Conquest of Paradise (1992), which retold the story of Christopher Columbus and his discovery of a New World:

At two o’clock in the morning the land was discovered, at two leagues’ distance; they took in sail and remained under the square-sail lying to till day, which was Friday, when they found themselves near a small island, one of the Lucayos, called in the Indian language Guanahani. Presently they descried people, naked, and the Admiral landed in the boat, which was armed, along with Martin Alonzo Pinzon, and Vincent Yanez his brother, captain of the Nina. The Admiral bore the royal standard, and the two captains each a banner of the Green Cross, which all the ships had carried; this contained the initials of the names of the King and Queen each side of the cross, and a crown over each letter Arrived on shore, they saw trees very green many streams of water, and diverse sorts of fruits. (more…)

Published in: on October 7, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Conquest of Paradise  
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How Ya Gonna Keep ’em Down On the Farm?

 

 

Something for the weekend.   How Ya Gonna Keep ’em Down On the Farm?  With music by Walter Donaldson and words by Joe Young and Sam M. Lewis, the humorous song became immensely popular in 1919, especially with troops awaiting demobilization.  The song reflected a real concern among parents and wives that their doughboys would come back changed men.  Well, they did, but most of them resumed their former lives with little fuss or bother. (more…)

Published in: on September 23, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on How Ya Gonna Keep ’em Down On the Farm?  
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