Joan of Arc, They Are Calling You

I commend you to God; may God watch over you and grant you grace so that you can maintain the good cause of the Kingdom of France.

Joan of Arc

 

Something for the weekend.  Joan of Arc, They Are Calling You.  A hit song a hundred years ago in the US.  Music by Jack Wells and lyrics by Al Bryan and Willie Weston.  Although the Maid of Orleans would not be canonized until 1920, the French had regarded her as a saint since her death.  In World War I French soldiers would usually have an image of Joan of Arc on them as they went into battle in a War most of them regarded as a Crusade to save France.

Grenadier Guards Go Full Sousa

 

Something for the weekend.  The British Grenadier Guards give a stirring rendition of Sousa’s Stars and Stripes Forever.  God bless our cousins!

Poor Kitty Popcorn

 

 

Something for the weekend.  One of the more bizarre songs to arise from our Civil War:  Poor Kitty Popcorn.  Sung by Bobby Horton who has a talent for resurrecting even the most obscure of Civil War tunes.

Published in: on July 15, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Poor Kitty Popcorn  
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The Ballad of the Green Mountain Boys

Something for the weekend.  The Ballad of the Green Mountain Boys, celebrating the exploits of the Vermont militia during the American Revolution.  The Green Mountain Boys mustered again in the War of 1812, the Civil War and the Spanish American War.  The Vermont National Guard today is informally known as The Green Mountain Boys.

Green Mountain Boys Flag

Published in: on July 1, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on The Ballad of the Green Mountain Boys  
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Good-bye Broadway, Hello France

 

Something for the weekend.  Good-bye Broadway, Hello France.  Like the Civil War, World War I produced endless songs, most of which were never heard of again after the  War was concluded.  Quite popular during the War was Good-bye Broadway, Hello France, written in 1917 by by Billy Baskette, with lyrics written by C. Francis Reisner and Benny Davis.  Whenever a World War I documentary has ever been produced, this song is often played as US troops are shown being shipped to France.

Published in: on June 17, 2017 at 3:30 am  Comments Off on Good-bye Broadway, Hello France  
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June is Bustin’ Out All Over

Something for the weekend.  June is Bustin’ Out All Over (1956).  We had a wet and very cool May in Central Illinois, but June feels like June.  I became familiar with this song as a child listening to it being played on the Captain Kangaroo Show.  Leslie Uggams gave a memorable rendition in 1968:

 

Published in: on June 3, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on June is Bustin’ Out All Over  
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Nearer, My God, To Thee

 

Something for the weekend.  Nearer, My God, to Thee, sung by Mahalia Jackson.  Written in 1841 by Sarah Fuller Flower Adams, it retells the story of Jacob’s Dream.  A hymn of surpassing power in time of grief and loss, it was played by Confederate bands after Pickett’s Charge, and was sounded while the Rough Riders buried their dead.  Its title was the last words said by a dying President McKinley and the band on the Titanic ended their heroic service by playing the hymn as the ship sank beneath the waves. (more…)

Published in: on May 20, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Nearer, My God, To Thee  
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The Reluctant Conscript

 

Something for the weekend.  The Reluctant Conscript performed by Bobby Horton who has waged a one man crusade to bring Civil War era music to modern audiences.  This song is typical of the type of humorous songs sung by soldiers on both sides.    Civil War soldiers endured hardships and casualties that modern students of that conflict can only regard as appalling.  However, the amazing thing is the good humor that those very brave men also displayed, often directed against themselves.  We stand on the shoulders on the giants, and among those giants are a lot of 18-20 young men clad in blue and gray, many of whom did not get any older, and who overwhelmingly met their fates with courage and a type of laughing gallantry that is all too foreign to our debased times.

Published in: on May 6, 2017 at 5:33 am  Comments Off on The Reluctant Conscript  
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The Girls Would Cry Shame and They’d Volunteer

 

Something for the weekend.  The immortal Tennessee Ernie Ford singing The Why and the Wherefore, a popular marching song for Union troops during the Civil War: (more…)

Published in: on April 22, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on The Girls Would Cry Shame and They’d Volunteer  
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Livery Stable Blues

 

Something for the weekend:  Livery Stable Blues.  Recorded by the Original Dixieland Jass Band on February 26, 1917, it was released in March 1917 by Victor and became a huge hit.  It was the first jazz song released on record.  The band prior to the end of the year would change their name to the Original Dixieland Jazz Band.

Published in: on March 11, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Livery Stable Blues  
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