Fifty Years

 

(I originally posted this at The American Catholic, and I thought the Space mavens of Almost Chosen People might find it amusing.)

 

Hattip to commenter Dale Price.  My motto has always been:  “Slay all the Lunies, and let God sort ’em out!”

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Published in: on March 3, 2019 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Fifty Years  
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Kalends of March

 

Today is the Kalends of March.  On this day in 293 AD the Emperors Diocletian and Maximian appointed Constantius Chlorus and Galerius as Caesars.  Constantius Chlorus and Galerian eventually became Emperors.  On the death of his father, Constantine seized the title of Emperor.  After a series of wars he became sole Emperor and proclaimed  the legalization of Christianity in the Edict of Milan and became, on his deathbed, the first baptized Christian Emperor of Rome.  Take that Ides of March, always hogging all the limelight!

 

Published in: on March 1, 2019 at 5:26 am  Comments Off on Kalends of March  
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One of the Many Reasons I am a Conservative

 

(I originally posted this at The American Catholic, and I thought the humor mavens of Almost Chosen People might enjoy it.)

Published in: on February 8, 2019 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on One of the Many Reasons I am a Conservative  
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Rubber Chicken Version of Pachelbel’s Canon in D

 

 

 

 

 

(I originally posted this at TAC and thought the Pachelbel and/or rubber chicken mavens of Almost Chosen People might enjoy it.)

Hattip to commenter Dale Price for this example of lunatic genius.  As for that whirring sound that you hear, well that should be obvious.

Published in: on August 15, 2018 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Rubber Chicken Version of Pachelbel’s Canon in D  
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Invading America is a Very, Very Bad Idea

 

Shall we expect some transatlantic military giant, to step the Ocean, and crush us at a blow? Never!–All the armies of Europe, Asia and Africa combined, with all the treasure of the earth (our own excepted) in their military chest; with a Buonaparte for a commander, could not by force, take a drink from the Ohio, or make a track on the Blue Ridge, in a trial of a thousand years.

Abraham Lincoln, January 27, 1838

Hattip to Ace of Spades blog for the map.

 

 

Should hostilities once break out between Japan and the United States, it is not enough that we take Guam and the Philippines, nor even Hawaii and San Francisco. To make victory certain, we would have to march into Washington and dictate the terms of peace in the White House. I wonder if our politicians, among whom armchair arguments about war are being glibly bandied about in the name of state politics, have confidence as to the final outcome and are prepared to make the necessary sacrifices.

Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, Commander in Chief, Imperial Combined Fleet, January 26, 1941

Published in: on May 21, 2018 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Invading America is a Very, Very Bad Idea  
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Parting is Such Sweet Sorrow

Patriotism in the female sex is the most disinterested of all virtues. Excluded from honors and from offices, we cannot attach ourselves to the State or Government from having held a place of eminence. Even in the freest countries our property is subject to the control and disposal of our partners, to whom the laws have given a sovereign authority. Deprived of a voice in legislation, obliged to submit to those laws which are imposed upon us, is it not sufficient to make us indifferent to the public welfare? Yet all history and every age exhibit instances of patriotic virtue in the female sex; which considering our situation equals the most heroic of yours.

Abigail Adams to John Adams, June 17, 1782

 

 

Published in: on February 1, 2018 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Parting is Such Sweet Sorrow  
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The Dino Conspiracy

 

A video celebrating the unsung contribution of Dinosaurs to US victory in World War II.  Prior to this video the only other source to recall this forgotten chapter of World War II was Star Spangled War Stories, a DC comic book series in the Sixties.

 

 

 

Why has this history been kept from us?  An accident?  I think not!  It is a conspiracy so vast that the almost entire lack of evidence proves the conspiracy!

Published in: on January 18, 2018 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on The Dino Conspiracy  
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An Unforgettable Version of the Twelve Days of Christmas

Something for the weekend.  I have always found the Twelve Days of Christmas a bit boring.  I was therefore enchanted when I heard this off-beat version by the acapella group Straight No Chaser as my son and I were driving back from the U of I  after I picked him up after finals in December of 2012.  Humor, the needed leavening of life!

Published in: on December 16, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on An Unforgettable Version of the Twelve Days of Christmas  
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Will Success Spoil Jeff Davis?

I was four years old when the Civil War centennial began and eight years old when it ended, but even I recall what a big hoopla it all was.  In the midst of it all, Thomas Lawrence Connolley, who would become the foremost historian of the Confederate Army of Tennessee, brought out a book in 1963 entitled Will Success Spoil Jeff Davis?, a satirical look at the often over the top aspects of the centennial observations.  The book is a howlingly funny look at Civil War mania and still is relevant today.  Here is a tiny sample:

The easiest way to publish something on the War is to submit an article to a historical journal. Better still, start your own journal. There are some two thousand in print and, judging by the tone of the articles, many of them are in need of material. Journal writing has its advantages. If he cannot write good prose, the writer can bury himself in footnotes. The footnote is a clever device, designed to confuse the general reader and absolve the author of any lawsuits. For example, consider a typical footnote to the statement “General Crumbley was a bastard.” 34

34. Ibid, see also, Cornstalk, Bastards in Gray, loc. sic.* op. sit., loc. site, sob. Many maintain that General Crumbley was not a bastard. See Thirty Years  View by Mrs. Crumbley, op. sit., sic. hoc. Major Kumpley maintained that the General may have been a bastard but that he was indeed
a “magnificent old bastard at that/* See diary of Isaac Bumpley, Moose University Archives, XXCI, pt, 2, Sept. 21, 1863. In addition to being a bastard, the General was also a Mason. See diary of Cornelius Kraut, 1st Wisconsin Infantry, SWMVHR (XXI, Je. 45).

(more…)

Published in: on October 13, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Will Success Spoil Jeff Davis?  
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Stalin is Still Dead

Strong language advisory as to the above video:

I have long thought that there was a hilarious dark comedy waiting to be written about the power struggle that occurred in the Soviet Union after the death of Stalin.  His daughter described his dying which took several days:

“Father’s death was slow and difficult…. His face became dark and different… his features were becoming unrecognizable…. The death agony was terrible. It choked him slowly as we watched… At the last moment he suddenly opened his eyes. It was a horrible look — either mad, or angry and full of fear of death…. Suddenly he raised his left hand and sort of either pointed up somewhere, or shook his finger at us all… The next moment his soul, after one last effort, broke away from his body.”

The film is coming out on October 20, and judging from the trailer it looks rather historically accurate.  Stalin’s death began a long chain of events that ended with the fall of the Soviet Union.  A fitting “celebration” of the centennial of the October Revolution.

Published in: on September 29, 2017 at 4:03 am  Comments Off on Stalin is Still Dead  
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