Book Haul

As faithful readers of this blog know, I am a hopeless bibliophile.  Fortunately my bride shares that affliction.  Yesterday we went down to a library sale in Normal, Illinois.  Here are my purchases with comments.  For the sake of brevity I will not include the purchases of my bride.

  1. The Class Struggle in the Ancient World, G.E.M. de Sainte Croix (1981)-I have long searched for this tome.  Although a Marxist interpretation of the Ancient world, I have heard good things about it from historians I respect.  We shall see.
  2. Chivalry, Leon Gautier (1989)-A Nineteenth Century look at the everyday life of French knights in the Twelfth Century.
  3. The Black Death, Philip Ziegler (1993)-An illustrated version of Ziegler’s classic 1969 study of the plague that killed 25% of the population of Europe in a handful of years.  Not light beach reading.
  4. 1812: Napoleon in Moscow, Paul Britten Austin (1995)-It is a melancholy reflection on human intelligence to ponder that the greatest general, perhaps, in human history decided to invade Russia in order to cause the Russians to stop trading with Great Britain.  The trade embargo of course was a disastrous policy that merely caused problems in Europe, the Brits getting rich by having a monopoly on trade with the rest of the World, and carrying on an immense smuggling trade with Europe.  In addition, Napoleon assumed that Russia was merely Austria writ large, and if he took Moscow, (not even the capital of Russia at that time), the Tsar would come to heel.  Of course Napoleon also amassed 600,000 troops for the invasion without making sufficient logistical arrangements for them, once they could not live off the land.  When geniuses make blunders, they often are beauts.
  5. 1812:  The Great Retreat, Paul Britten Austin ((1996)-See above.
  6. Jacksonland, Steve Inskeep (2015)-The story of the great land grab from the Cherokees.
  7. The Southern Dream of a Carribean Empire, Robert E. May (1989)-A fascinating look at Southern based filibustering expeditions in Central America in the 1850s and the desire of some Southerners to acquire Cuba and other islands in the West Indies.  If the Confederacy had achieved independence, I have no doubt that the Union and the Confederacy would have directly clashed, or waged proxy wars, in this area.
  8. Attack and Die:  Civil War Military Tactics & the Southern Heritage, Grady McWhiney and Perry D. Jamieson (1982) One of the more laughable books written about the Civil War, it attributed to the South a fondness for head long attacks due to the “Celtic” heritage of the Southerners.  The thesis was ridiculous for many reasons, including that both the Union and the Confederacy had similar ethnic makeups among their native white populations, and that Union commanders were just as fond of headlong attacks (Fredericksburg, Cold Harbor, Kenesaw Mountain, etc.) as Confederate commanders.
  9. Fesseden of Maine, Charles A. Jellison (1962) A biography of the Civil War era senator from Maine, who sacrificed his political career when he voted against the conviction of President Andrew Johnson.
  10. The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant, Volumes 11 and 12, June 1-November 15 1864, editor John Y. Simon (1984)-These volumes go for a hundred bucks apiece, so I was happy to get these books for a buck apiece.  Grant was a master of conciseness and clarity in an age that treasured verbosity and a rotund style.  His writings are a pleasure to read, beyond their historical value.  This was a lifetime project of Professor John Y. Simon at Southern Illinois University.  He had completed his 30th volume when his life’s work came to a screeching halt in 2008 due to sexual harassment claims by two co-workers when he was 75.  Under the stress of the allegations he died, and SIU ultimately lost the Grant papers to the University of Mississippi which completed the project with the publication of the 31st and 32nd volumes.  Simon’s widow, they had been married for 51 years, disputed the sexual abuse allegations.  Go here to read about what may have been a modern version of a witch hunt.
  11. Civil War Books:  A Critical Bibliography, edited by Allan Nevins, James I. Robertson and Bell I. Wiley (1969)-I am a sucker for annotated bibliographies, so I was delighted to find this bibliography by three great Civil War historians.  The descriptions of the entries are blunt.  For example in regard to the Civil War history of Herbert Aptheker the entry reads:  “Primarily propaganda masking as history, with very strong Marxist overtones and influences.” 
  12. Centennial History of Illinois, Volume III The Civil War Era, Arthur Charles Cole (1919);  Volume IV The Industrial State, Ernest Ludlow Bogart and Charles Manfred Thompson (1920);  Volume V The Modern Commonwealth, Ernest Ludlow Bogart and John Mabry Mathews (1920)-Three of the five volume history commissioned by the Illinois Centennial Commission.  This year is the bicentennial of Illinois.  I am unaware of any history like this underway.  That may be because Illinois is broke.  It may also be just as well.  Glancing through the three volumes they seem pretty lackluster, although the third volume, due to the intrinsic interest of the Civil War, may be worth reading.
  13. Illinois Literature:  The Nineteenth Century, edited by John E. Hallwas (1986)-With such writers as Lincoln and Grant, and a host of lesser luminaries, this book will supply some interesting reading for me.
  14. McLean County in the World War, E.E.Pierson and J. L.Hasbrouck editors (1921)-One of a host of books in the wake of World War I commemorating the war effort of local communities.  These volumes provide largely untapped resources for histories of American participation in the Great War.  Glancing at it, I am struck by the number of servicemen who died of Spanish influenza and accidents.  A section on “Our Colored Heroes” recalls the participation in the War of black men from McLean County.  Extensive information on the home front helps bring to life a time a century ago in a county I am quite familiar with.
  15. A Guide to the History of Illinois, edited by John Hoffman (1991)-A great resource for those interested in the history of the Land of Lincoln.  Chapters by experts on the different periods in Illinois list available articles and books with comments as to their value.
  16. The American Revisionists:  The Lessons of Intervention in World War I, Warren I. Cohen (1967)-A look at five historians who, prior to World War I, championed the viewpoint that American intervention in World War I had been a mistake.
  17. The Panay Incident, Hamilton Darby Perry (1969)-World War II almost came early when Japanese bombers sunk the American gunboat Panay in China on December 13, 1937.
  18. Combined Fleet Decoded, John Prados, (1995)-Prados is a game designer and a writer.  I have played his games and read his books with enjoyment over the years.  Left wing in his politics, he does not allow that to impact his historical research.  This book looks at American intelligence in the Pacific in World War II.  Being able to read the messages of the Japanese fleet gave the Americans a huge advantage, the impact of which Prados examines in detail.
  19. Hitler’s Jewish Soldiers, Bryan Mark Rigg (2002)-I was surprised to learn that some 150,000 men of Jewish ancestry served in the Wehrmacht during World War II, almost all of them draftees.  The Nazis regarded Jews as a race rather than a religion.  This opened endless perplexities as to who was a Jew.  Half Jews were discriminated against, but usually not rounded up for extermination if they lived in households with non-Jews.  Quarter Jews usually escaped discrimination.  Serving in the Wehrmacht, some half Jews attained General rank.  Hitler had the power to declare that the anti-Jewish laws did not apply to a specific individual and/or “Aryanize” someone by declaring them to be a German rather than a Jew.  These men often served valiantly while having relatives who were being exterminated by the Nazis.  In 1940 Hitler ordered the expulsion of half Jews from the Wehrmacht, but exceptional soldiers could apply for exemption and many of them did.  Of course, the safest place for many Jews in Nazi Germany could be, ironically, serving in the Wehrmacht.  Jewish veterans often noted that their fellow soldiers tended to accept them, and tried to protect them.  Like most features of life in the nightmare that was Nazi Germany, the treatment of partial Jews in the Wehrmacht has a bizarre quality to it.
  20. Flying Tigers, Sam Kliener, (2018)-If Hollywood ever wishes to celebrate real life American heroes they have to look no farther than the men of the American Volunteer Group who flew for China from November 1941-July 4, 1942.  Always vastly outnumbered, and flying planes in many respects inferior to most of the Japanese fighters they fought, the men of the Flying Tigers shot down 229 Japanese planes, achieving a stunning ten to one kill to loss ratio.  Their victories sustained American morale in the dark early days of the War.  On July 4, 1942, the Flying Tigers were transformed into the 23rd Fight Group, United States Army Air Force, with their commander being Brigadier General Claire Chennault, commander of the Flying Tigers, the man whose brilliant tactical innovations and skilled leadership helped his men achieve their incredible against the odds victories.  The 14th American Air Force stationed in China would later take up the proud title of Flying Tigers.
  21. Islands of Destiny, John Prados, (2012)-A look by Prados at the Solomons Campaign which he rightly views as the turning point of the War in the Pacific.  As Admiral “Bull” Halsey said, “Before Guadalcanal the enemy advanced at his pleasure– after Guadalcanal he retreated at ours.”

 

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Published in: on September 30, 2018 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Book Haul  
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Springfield Book Haul

As usual my family and I took our annual July excursion down to Springfield to visit the Lincoln Museum and to pray for the repose of Mr. Lincoln’s soul at his tomb.  My son outside the tomb lifted up a little girl who was trying to reach the nose of Lincoln’s bust outside of the tomb so she could rub it for luck.  Thus are bits of Lincoln lore passed down the generations.  As usual I purchased books at the Museum and at the Prairie Archives bookstore.

 

 

  1. Stanton, Walter Stahr (2017)-Lincoln’s Secretary of War is one of those major figures of the Civil War who, for one reason or another, never seem to attract scholarly attention.  The research on Stanton has been truly meager, considering his importance, and hopefully this volume will spur further study of Lincoln’s “Mars”.
  2. Lincoln in the Atlantic World, Louise L. Stevenson (2015)- A look at how Lincoln incorporated knowledge from abroad both before and during his Presidency.  I will need some convincing here.  Few presidents have been more consumed by domestic considerations than Lincoln, and few presidents have been more completely focused throughout their careers on the US than Lincoln.
  3. Lincoln’s Greatest Journey, Noah Andre Trudeau (2016)- A veteran Civil War historian puts under the microscope the sixteen days that Lincoln spent with Grant at the headquarters of the Army of the Potomac at the tail end of the War.
  4. Our One Common Country, James B. Conroy (2014)- A look at the abortive peace conference on February 3, 1865 which demonstrated why the Civil War was fought:  no grounds for compromise existed between the warring parties.
  5. Grant Rises in the West, Kenneth P. Williams, (1952, 1956)-Williams died of cancer in 1958 before he could complete his five volume study, Lincoln Finds a General.  These two volumes look at Grant up through the siege of Vicksburg.  Grant was fortunate that he had a few years to master the trade of being a general before he faced Lee in the Overland Campaign of 1864.
  6. Hitler:  The Man and the Military Leader, Percy Ernst Schramm (1963-English translation 1970)-In the very top echelon of German medievalists prior to World War II, Schramm, with the rank of Major, served as staff diarist for the German General Staff during the War and had daily access to the High Command including Hitler.
  7. A History of the Habsburg Empire 1526-1918 (1974)-How this rattletrap collection of odds and ends survived as an empire as long as it did is one of the miracles of European history.  Compare and contrast the immensely powerful Second Reich that endured from 1871-1918.
  8. Lawrence of Arabia, Jeremy Wilson (1990)- The authorized, by his then surviving brother, biography of T.E. Lawrence.  New studies of Lawrence show up regularly and I doubt if there will ever be one that can be claimed to be definitive.  Lawrence was a fabulist (liar) of the first order, and loved telling conflicting versions of events in his life, and that greatly increases the work of any biographer.  Additionally, the people who came into contact with Lawrence often had quite different recollections than those set down by Lawrence.  Lawrence was a scholar and artist pretending to be a great warrior and prophet of Arab nationalism, and the pretense seems to have caused him to become somewhat detached from reality.  A deeply strange man who still eludes biographers down to the present.

 

Published in: on July 16, 2018 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Springfield Book Haul  
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Don’s Latest Book Haul

 

As part of my annual vacation schedule I take three days off in July whether I need to or not. Last Friday my bride and I were out and about with my son, who took the Illinois bar exam last week. Among other stops, we went to too Half Price book outlets and purchased the following books (I omit the books my bride and son purchased): (more…)

Published in: on July 31, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Don’s Latest Book Haul  
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July, Lincoln and Springfield

 

 

Last Friday my family and I made our annual pilgrimage to Springfield to attend the Lincoln Museum and go to the Lincoln Tomb.  As we made our way though the Museum we encountered, for the second year in a row, a large number of Amish touring the Museum, the women wearing long dresses and poke bonnets that made them look as if they stepped from the 1860s.  The Amish were obviously fascinated by what they were seeing and talked among themselves in “Pennsylvania Dutch”.   Illinois has had a large colony of Amish in the Arthur, Illinois area, about 72 miles from Springfield, since the 19th century.  (Although the Amish are as theologically as far from the Church as it is possible for Christians to be, I should note that I have a huge amount of respect for them.  They take care of their own, and ask nothing from the larger society in which they live, except to be left alone, a sentiment which resonates with me.)

After the museum, as usual we had a first rate lunch at the nearby The Feed Store.  (Nothing shouts Midwest more than eating in a restaurant with a name like that.)  (I highly recommend their barley soup, their tuna fish salad sandwich, and any of their many variants of cheesecake.)

We finished our day at Lincoln’s tomb praying for the repose of his soul and the souls of his wife and kids.)  Once again I thought to myself how nice it was that the first or second greatest President in our history, has his tomb in a cemetery open to all, where there are no guards, no charges for admission, not even for parking.  You simply pull up to the small parking area next to the tomb, go in and make your way through the tomb.  We owe Mary Todd Lincoln for that.  After Lincoln’s murder, there was an attempt to have Lincoln buried in Washington with a grand mausoleum being erected thereafter over his remains.  Mary Lincoln would have none of it.  She took her dead husband, and had the remains of her dead son Willie exhumed, and traveled with them both back to Springfield for burial.  She wanted nothing more from Washington except to get out of there as quickly as she could, a city where she had suffered grief that makes her such a poignant figure in American history.  (An exhibit in the Museum shows her framed by a rain stained window, sitting forlornly, mourning the loss of Willie.  My bride and I, sadly, having lost a son know precisely how she feels.)  We made sure to rub the nose of the nose of the huge bust of Lincoln outside of the tomb.  Most noses of Lincoln on metal statues and busts in Illinois are shiny due to the Illinois superstition that rubbing the nose of a bust or a statue of Lincoln brings good luck.  With my son taking the Illinois bar at the end of July, it can’t hurt.

It wouldn’t be a McClarey expedition if we didn’t buy books.  We bought books yesterday at the Museum and the Prairie Archives bookstore in Springfield which boasts a collection of a quarter of a million books. Most of the books were about Lincoln or the Civil War (surprise!) and here are those books:

Lincoln the President:  The Last Full Measure, J. G. Ballard and Richard N. Current (1955).  This is the fourth and final volume in Ballard’s study of Lincoln.  At the time of his death in 1953 he had written only eight chapters.  In his will he suggested either historian Allan Nevins or Richard N. Current to finish his work if he could not.  Current took up the challenge, even though he had never written about Lincoln before, and completed the volume in 1955.  He later became one of the great Lincoln scholars of his day, writing numerous books on Lincoln and dying in 2012 at age 100.  Now I have the complete set.  I think I will read it backwards like witches are said to say their prayers. (more…)

Published in: on July 17, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on July, Lincoln and Springfield  
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Civil War Book Haul

 

While in Wisconsin, my family and I visited the Civil War museum in Kenosha.  It has quite a few fascinating exhibits, including period battle flags, uniforms, films, a toy soldier exhibit showing the stand of the Iron Brigade on the first day of Gettysburg, etc.  One of my favorite features of the museum is their gift shop which has a huge collection of used Civil War books for sale.  I never fail to find often rare books on the Civil War.  Here is a list of my purchases for 43 dollars earlier in the week:

  1. Jefferson Davis:   American Patriot 1808-1861, Hudson Strode (1955)-Poor Jefferson Davis, portrayed as the Devil incarnate by the North during the War, he was often used as a scapegoat by Southerners after the War.  The simple truth is that Davis was a gifted man who brought the Confederacy close to independence against all the odds.  Hudson Strode was the first historian to have access to many of the personal papers of Jefferson Davis and launched a vigorous counterattack to the image of Davis as a bloodless pedant, revealing him instead as a passionate and complex man.
  2. The Hidden Face of the Civil War, Otto Eisenschiml (1961)-The Austrian born Eisenschiml was an oil company executive, and a tireless Civil War historian.  He is perhaps best known for his 1937 look at the Lincoln assassination which posited that Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton was behind the assassination.  I regard this theory as completely loony.  However, Eisenschiml was never afraid of controversy and is always entertaining to read.    In this volume he savages both the North and the South for incompetence in the waging of the Civil War.
  3. The Celebrated Case of Fitz John Porter:  An American Dreyfus Affair, Otto Eisenschiml (1950)-Eisenschiml takes on the case of General Porter who was court-martialed and removed from the Army for his actions at Second Bull Run, and who fought for 25 years to clear his name, a fight he ultimately won.
  4. Lincoln’s Scapegoat General: A Life of General Benjamin Butler, 1818-1893, Richard S. West, Jr. (1965)-A book in defense of “Beast” Butler.  I like seeing arguments made for impossible cases, and attempting to convince me that Butler was not the most incompetent Union general is close to an impossible task.
  5. General Sherman’s Son:  The Life of Thomas Ewing Sherman, SJ, Joseph T. Durkin, SJ (1959)  A biography of the Jesuit son of General Sherman written by a Jesuit.  Go here to read about Father Sherman.
  6. Grant Wins the War, James R. Arnold (1997)-A good one volume look at the Vicksburg campaign, the most decisive campaign of the War.

(more…)

Published in: on July 25, 2016 at 5:30 am  Comments (1)  
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Book Haul: Thirty-Eight Dollars

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My bride and I enjoyed going to a used book sale last Thursday that we have been attending for about the last fifteen years.   We spent $38.00. As usual Don the spendthrift purchased most of the books:

1.  My bride purchased A Guide Through Narnia by Martha G. Sammons (1979) (Essays on C.S. Lewis’s “Chronicles of Narnia” – but it was with the travel books, so I was expecting more of a Narnian gazetteer for travelers), The Bride Wore Pearls by Liz Carlyle (2012) (Historical romance novel set in the Victorian era; our Anglo-Indian heroine’s costume in the cover art is late Regency, though, and she hops into bed with our quasi-Masonic hero about half a dozen chapters in; not worth finishing), Lose 200 Lbs. This Weekend by Don Aslett (2000) (Another of his “de-clutter your life” books) and Schroeder’s Antiques Price Guide (1999) (The most recent they had there — presumably the collectors are hanging onto anything more recent; what I really needed was a print version of info I’d already found online about the collectible figurines I’m selling on eBay, plus tips on how to pack them for shipping).

I purchased all the rest:

2.   The Battle:  A History of the Battle of Waterloo by Alessandro Barbero (2003)-I like the fact that the author begins his book with quotes from Wellington indicating what folly it was to attempt to write the history of this battle.

3.   Ivory Vikings by Nancy Marie Brown (2015)-Speculation on the origin of nine medieval chess pieces.

4.   The Arms of Krupp (1968-paperback 1970)-William Manchester’s history of the German family of weapons manufacturers.

5.   The French and Indian War by Walter R. Borneman (2006)-The French and Indian War has been attracting more attention recently by scholars, which is a good thing.  The various French wars of the seventeenth and eighteenth century had an enormous impact on the colonies that would become the United States.  Our first steps toward a unified nation were taken as a result of these conflicts, and many of the men who led our forces in the American Revolution learned the trade of war in the greatest and last of these struggles.

6.   The Achievement of Samuel Johnson by W. Jackson Bate (1955)-A look at the writing and thought of one of my favorite literary curmudgeons.

7.   Bomber Offensive by Noble Frankland (1970)-One of the myriad Ballantine buck books on World War II that I gobbled up as a teenager.

8.   Abraham Lincoln by Thomas Keneally (2003)-One of the brief Penguin Lives where established authors write a short life of some famous individual.  The authors usually have no special expertise as a biographer of the subject they are writing about.  As one might expect, this experiment has produced mixed results.

9.   Leadership in War by Sir John Smyth (1974)-A look at British generals in World War II by a Brigadier General and holder of the Victoria Cross. (The Brit equivalent to the Medal of Honor.)

10.  Patton:  A Study in Command by H. Essame (1974)-A well written look at Patton by a British Major General who commanded a brigade in World War II.

11.  Aristotle For Everybody:  Difficult Thought Made Easy by Mortimer Adler (1978)-I have long been a fan of the work of the late Mortimer Adler.  A leader of the revival of interest in Saint Thomas Aquinas in the twenties, he founded the Great Books Program.  He spent his life explaining to moderns in the West their intellectual heritage.  A non-observant Jew, he long was attracted to Catholicism.  Baptized as an Episcopalian in 1984, the faith of his wife,  he was baptized into the Faith in 1999, two years before his death. (more…)

Published in: on June 20, 2016 at 5:30 am  Comments (1)  
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Lincoln Book Haul

 

 

Well, last Thursday my family and I made our annual pilgrimage to Springfield to attend the Lincoln Museum and go to the Lincoln Tomb.  As we made our way though the Museum we encountered a large number of Amish touring the Museum, the women wearing long dresses and poke bonnets that made them look as if they stepped from the 1860s.  The Amish were obviously fascinated by what they were seeing and talked among themselves in “Pennsylvania Dutch”.   Illinois has had a large colony of Amish in the Arthur, Illinois area, about 72 miles from Springfield, since the 19th century.  (Although the Amish are as theologically as far from the Church as it is possible for Christians to be, I should note that I have a huge amount of respect for them.  They take care of their own, and ask nothing from the larger society in which they live, except to be left alone, a sentiment which resonates with me.)  After the museum my family went to the Prairie Archives bookstore where I again marveled at their large collection of Lincoln books.

As usual we had a first rate lunch at the nearby The Feed Store.  (Nothing shouts Midwest more than eating in a restaurant with a name like that.)  We finished our day at Lincoln’s tomb praying for the repose of his soul and the souls of his wife and kids.)  Once again I thought to myself how nice it was that the first or second greatest President in our history, has his tomb in a cemetery open to all, where there are no guards, no charges for admission, not even for parking.  You simply pull up to the small parking area next to the tomb, go in and make your way through the tomb.  We owe Mary Todd Lincoln for that.  After Lincoln’s murder, there was an attempt to have Lincoln buried in Washington with a grand mausoleum being erected thereafter over his remains.  Mary Lincoln would have none of it.  She took her dead husband, and had the remains of her dead son Willie exhumed, and traveled with them both back to Springfield for burial.  She wanted nothing more from Washington except to get out of there as quickly as she could, a city where she had suffered grief that makes her such a poignant figure in American history.  (An exhibit in the Museum shows her framed by a rain stained window, sitting forlornly, mourning the loss of Willie.  My bride observed to me yesterday that, sadly, we know precisely how she feels.)

It wouldn’t be a McClarey expedition if we didn’t buy books.  We bought books yesterday at the Museum, the Prairie Archives and a used book store in Bloomington during an extended pit stop on our way home to Dwight.  Most of the books were about Lincoln (surprise!) and here are those books:

  1.  Lincoln’s Political Generals, David Work (2009)-Usually the incompetence of the generals appointed for political reasons is highlighted by historians, but it has always struck me how many of them, a perfect example is Illinois Congressman turned general John “Black Jack” Logan, eventually became competent officers.  Just as more than a few West Pointers failed the iron test of war, more than a few politician-soldiers passed it.
  2. Abraham Lincoln:  The Quest For Immortality, Dwight G. Anderson (1982)-A controversial book, Anderson contends that Lincoln deliberately sought to achieve immortality by becoming a second Washington.  I find his thesis unconvincing, but I was happy to add his book to my collection as it is well argued and does highlight an aspect of Lincoln often missed, surprisingly, by other historians:  that Lincoln was very conscious of history and how he and his contemporaries would be perceived by future generations.
  3. Lincoln the President, volume II (1945-reprinted 1974)-James G. Randall’s Lincoln the President is an exhaustive look at Lincoln as President, from an interesting standpoint: an admirer of Lincoln who also thought the Civil War was unnecessary. Scholarship was superb, albeit dated after six decades.  I now have three volumes, of the four, in my library.
  4. Journal of the Abraham Lincoln Association, Winter 2008 and Summer 2009. Cutting edge articles on studies of Lincoln and his times are published twice a year by the Springfield based Abraham Lincoln Association.
  5. Abraham Lincoln in the Kitchen:  A Culinary View of Lincoln’s Life and Times, Rae Katherine Eighmey, (2013)-I told my bride that Lincoln had a marked indifference to what he ate, with a slight preference for the humble country fare on which he was raised, but that did not dampen her enthusiasm for this tome.
  6. “Here I Have Lived”:  A History of Lincoln’s Springfield, Paul M. Angle (1933-reprint 1971)-A look at Springfield during the life of Lincoln.  It is hard to overestimate the impact of that community on Lincoln.
  7. Abraham Lincoln and the Structure of Reason, David Hirsch and Dan Van Haften (2010-first paperback printing 2015)-A look at the impact of Lincoln’s study of Euclid on the way he thought.  Go here to read a post I wrote back in 2012 on that subject.
  8. The Annotated Lincoln, edited by Harold Holzer and Thomas A. Horrocks (2016)-A 604 page look at most of the major writings of Lincoln and a representative sample of his correspondence.   The clarity, and logical precision, of Lincoln’s mind shines through in his writings.  When one considers the meager education that Lincoln had, viewing his body of work makes one weep for the output of most modern politicians, albeit one can rarely be certain what is written by any modern politician after they attain office, and what is the product of the minds of staffers.  O tempora, O mores!

(more…)

Published in: on June 15, 2016 at 11:28 am  Comments Off on Lincoln Book Haul  
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