Neil Armstrong and the Flag

 

Leave it to Hollywood to foul things up:

 

Ryan Gosling is defending his new Neil Armstrong biopic against pre-release criticism it has garnered over a decision by director Damien Chazelle to omit from the film the iconic placing of the American flag on the moon.

Gosling said it was his view that Armstrong’s moon walk, “transcended countries and borders,” according to quotes featured in U.K.’s Telegraph, reportedly from a press conference at the Venice Film Festival.
“I think this was widely regarded in the end as a human achievement [and] that’s how we chose to view it,” Gosling reportedly said. “I also think Neil was extremely humble, as were many of these astronauts, and time and time again he deferred the focus from himself to the 400,000 people who made the mission possible.”
Go here to read the rest.  So history is to be mangled in order to satisfy some sort of globalist rubbish.  The moon landing was a big event for all of humanity but from first to start it was an American project paid for by US taxpayers, with American astronauts risking their lives.  Neil Armstrong was an American patriot who fought for this country in the Korean War.  Chuck Yeager has summed this up well:
That’s not the Neil Armstrong I knew.  More Hollywood make believe.
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Published in: on September 2, 2018 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Neil Armstrong and the Flag  
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April 26, 1962: Ranger 4 Crashes Into Moon

 

The US Space Program had several rocky moments in its early years, and so it was with Ranger 4.  Launched on April 23, 1962, its trip to the Moon was flawless.  After entering a lunar orbit,  a malfunction caused telemetry to cease, and the capsule to become unresponsive to commands. Ranger 4 crashed into the darkside of the Moon on April 26, 1962.  And thus the first American spacecraft reached a celestial object.  As always, NASA learned from the failure, with a successful lunar mission by Ranger 7 in 194.

Published in: on April 26, 2018 at 10:45 am  Comments Off on April 26, 1962: Ranger 4 Crashes Into Moon  
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Sixty Years After Sputnik

 

I was less than one year old and the Space Race assumed ominous proportions with the launching of Sputnik on October 4, 1957 by the Soviet Union.  Its radio transmissions could be picked up easily by amateur radio enthusiasts and its orbit was low enough, the Soviets making sure its orbit was over the most densely populated portions of the planet, to be seen by the naked eye.  The propaganda victory for the Soviets was immense and the US saw its claim to be ahead in science seem to be hollow.   Politicians had a herd of collective cows and the Space Race was kicked into high gear.  The US satellite Explorer I was launched on January 31, 1958, the day following my future bride’s birth, after the Soviets had launched their second Sputnik in November of 1957.  Developing satellite technology in response to Sputnik and beating the Soviets to the moon  became  a key element in the Cold War.  Sputnik burned up on reentry on January 4, 1958, but its impact on history continues to reverberate to today.

 

Published in: on October 6, 2017 at 5:21 am  Comments (2)  
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March 16, 1926: Robert Goddard Launches First Liquid Fueled Rocket

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jSIq1XsdUqA

 

 

 

How many more years I shall be able to work on the problem, I do not know; I hope, as long as I live. There can be no thought of finishing, for “aiming at the stars”, both literally and figuratively, is a problem to occupy generations, so that no matter how much progress one makes, there is always the thrill of just beginning.

Robert Goddard to H.G. Wells, 1932

 

 

 

A very humble beginning to the Space Age 91 years ago, courtesy of Doctor Robert Goddard:

March 17, 1926. The first flight with a rocket using liquid propellants was made yesterday at Aunt Effie’s farm in Auburn…. Even though the release was pulled, the rocket did not rise at first, but the flame came out, and there was a steady roar. After a number of seconds it rose, slowly until it cleared the frame, and then at express train speed, curving over to the left, and striking the ice and snow, still going at a rapid rate. (more…)

Published in: on March 16, 2017 at 4:58 am  Comments Off on March 16, 1926: Robert Goddard Launches First Liquid Fueled Rocket  
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January 27, 1967: Apollo I Tragedy

 

 

Hard to believe it has been fifty years.  I was ten years old and watching the television show Time Tunnel when a news flash interrupted the show to convey the grim news that Apollo 1 astronauts Pilot Virgil I. “Gus” Grissom, Senior Pilot Edward H. White II, and Pilot Roger B. Chaffee had died in a fire in the space capsule during a simulated practice launch.  Subsequent investigation indicated that the fire probably started due to faulty electric wiring in the capsule, but the exact cause of the fire ignition has never been pinpointed, which has created a fertile ground for conspiracy theorists usually centering around an alleged plot to kill Grissom.  A sad day for the American Space Program fifty years ago.

Published in: on January 27, 2017 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on January 27, 1967: Apollo I Tragedy  
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Godspeed John Glenn

Published in: on December 11, 2016 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on Godspeed John Glenn  
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72 Year Old Buzz Aldrin Punches Out Lunar Truther

Ah, it does my heart good whenever I see this video.  Buzz Aldrin, who the loonie lunar truther was calling a coward, flew 65 combat missions during the Korean War and shot down two MIG-15s.  The police refused to arrest Aldrin, stating that he had been clearly provoked.  Aldrin has done many things worthy of medals in his long life, and socking that obnoxious creep was one of them!

Published in: on August 13, 2014 at 5:30 am  Comments Off on 72 Year Old Buzz Aldrin Punches Out Lunar Truther  
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Neil Armstrong: Requiescat in Pace

For those who may ask what they can do to honor Neil, we have a simple request. Honor his example of service, accomplishment and modesty, and the next time you walk outside on a clear night and see the moon smiling down at you, think of Neil Armstrong and give him a wink.

Statement of the Armstrong Family

 

 

 

The first man to walk on the moon, Neil Armstrong, died today at 82.  He served as a naval fighter pilot in Korea, flying 78 combat missions.  A test pilot after the war, his feats in that field were legendary, combining strong engineering ability, cold courage and preternatural flight skills.  He was accepted into the astronaut program in 1962.  On July 16, 1969, in the middle of the night in Central Illinois, he set foot on the moon.  My father and I, like most of the country, were riveted to the television screen as we watched a turning point in the history of humanity.  He intended to say, “That’s one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.” It came out: “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”  Godspeed Mr. Armstrong on the journey you have just embarked upon. (more…)

Published in: on August 25, 2012 at 4:37 pm  Comments (6)  
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February 20, 1962: God Speed John Glenn

Published in: on February 20, 2012 at 10:02 am  Comments Off on February 20, 1962: God Speed John Glenn  
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