March 8, 1917: Senate Introduces Cloture

 

 

 

Woodrow Wilson was no fan of Senate filibusters:

 

 

The Democrats controlled the Senate from 1913-1919 and Wilson hated the way that Republicans could bottle up his proposed legislation through the filibuster.  To mollify him, the Senate Democrats passed a rule change one hundred years ago that allowed the termination of debate on a two-thirds vote to invoke cloture.  Even after cloture each Senator could speak for an additional hour on the matter under consideration before a vote was taken.  Cloture existed more in theory than in practice.  Over the next 46 years the Senate would vote for cloture only five times.  There are several reasons why this was the case.

Filibusters added a touch of drama and comedy to otherwise dry proceedings.  The public generally enjoyed them as did more than a few Senators.  Many Senators prided themselves upon belonging to what they called the greatest deliberative body, and thought that the filibuster played an essential role in what made the Senate the Senate.  Southern Democrats, relying on the filibuster to stop civil rights legislation, were fervent supporters of the filibuster.  Many Senators realized that shifting political fortunes could turn a majority into a minority over night, and that the filibuster was the strongest tool of a minority. 

The film Mr. Smith Goes to Washington is a paean to the filibuster.  Ironically, cloture is never mentioned in the film, since a quick cloture vote would have taken the drama away from the Mr. Smith’s one man filibuster, although many Southern Senators did traditionally vote against cloture on the first vote, no matter what matter was under consideration, to show their support for the filibuster as a legislative device.

Advertisements
Published in: on March 8, 2017 at 5:30 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , ,

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://almostchosenpeople.wordpress.com/2017/03/08/march-8-1917-senate-introduces-cloture/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: