Auld Lang Syne

Something for the weekend.  Auld Lang Syne sung by the incomparable Arethra Franklin.  Written by the immortal Scots poet Bobby Burns in 1788, his poem captured perfectly the grandeur of human memory as it ponders the cherished past.  It is very appropriate that it has become an essential part of New Year’s Eve celebrations.  Here is his original version:

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,

and never brought to mind ?

Should auld acquaintance be forgot,

and auld lang syne ?

                                                                                                                    

For auld lang syne, my jo (or my dear),

 for auld lang syne,

 we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness 

 for auld lang syne.

And surely ye’ll be your pint-stowp !

and surely I’ll be mine !

And we’ll tak a cup o’ kindness yet,

for auld lang syne.

                                                                                                                    

We twa hae run about the braes,

and pu’d the gowans fine ;

But we’ve wander’d mony a weary fit,

sin auld lang syne.

                                                                                                                     

We twa hae paidl’d i’ the burn,

frae morning sun till dine;

But seas between us braid hae roar’d

sin auld lang syne.

                                                                                                                           

And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere!

and gie’s a hand o’ thine !

And we’ll tak a right gude-willy waught,

for auld lang syne.

Translated into Sassenach:

Should old acquaintance be forgot,

and never brought to mind?

Should old acquaintance be forgot,

and old lang syne ?

 
      

For auld lang syne, my dear,

 for auld lang syne,

we’ll take a cup of kindness yet,

for auld lang syne.

And surely you’ll buy your pint cup!

and surely I’ll buy mine!

And we’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet,

for auld lang syne.

We two have run about the slopes,

and picked the daisies fine ;

But we’ve wandered many a weary foot,

since auld lang syne.

We two have paddled in the stream,

from morning sun till dine;

But seas between us broad have roared

since auld lang syne.

And there’s a hand my trusty friend!

And give us a hand o’ thine!

And we’ll take a right good-will draught,

for auld lang syne.

About these ads
Published in: on December 31, 2011 at 5:30 am  Comments (2)  
Tags: ,

2 Comments

  1. from one who tracks their roots to the land between the isles (Scot-Irish) I believe you will find the translation of the Gaelic word “auld” to be better if stated “dearest one” instead of “old”. The English were good at beating us up, even our language. SMILE.

    When you hear an eighty year old man from the hills of West Virginia refer to his auld lady, there is respect, admiration and love, so unlike a inner city teenager referring to his mother at the OLD lady.

    Now might we take on the word “GAY”?
    I enjoy your site very much, In Christ, Dennis McCutcheon

  2. Fascinating Dennis. I wonder if the word Auld has multiple meanings in the context. I recall the tradional Scottish French alliances against the English were referred to collectively as the Auld Alliance.

    A Happy New Year to you and yours Dennis!


Comments are closed.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 141 other followers

%d bloggers like this: