Tax Revolt 1676

 

In many ways Bacon’s Rebellion in Virginia in 1676 was an eerie first run, a century early, of the same type of conflicts which would lead to the American Revolution.  Complaints by colonists of high taxes, a Royal Governor acting in defiance of a colonial legislature, a Virginia planter leading the forces in revolt, etc.  It was also a fierce struggle for power between  Royal Governor William Berkeley, and Nathaniel Bacon, a new comer to the colony from England, who was the leader of the rebels.  If Bacon at 29 hadn’t died suddenly on October 26, 1676 of dysentery, it is hard to say how much larger a role he would have played in American history.  Without him the revolt collapsed and Berkeley wreaked a bloody vengeance, executing 23 men.  He was recalled the next year to England by Charles II, the Merry Monarch, according to tradition, quipping, “That old fool has put to death more people in that naked country than I did here for the murder of my father.”

Here is the Declaration of the People drawn up by Bacon on July 30, 1676 to explain why action had to be taken against Governor Berkeley.  I have always thought Jefferson borrowed parts of the style of this document in the indictments against the actions of King George III in the Declaration of Independence.
                                                                                                                                                                        July 30,1676
                                                              The Declaration of the People

1.For haveing upon specious pretences of publiqe works raised greate unjust taxes upon the Comonality for the advancement of private favorites and other sinister ends, but noe visible effects in any measure adequate, For not haveing dureing this long time of his Gouvernement in any measure advanced this hopefull Colony either by fortificacons Townes or Trade.

2.For haveing abused and rendred contemptable the Magistrates of Justice, by advanceing to places of Judicature, scandalous and Ignorant favorites.

3.For haveing wronged his Majesties prerogative and interest, by assumeing Monopoly of the Beaver trade, and for haveing in that unjust gaine betrayed and sold his Majesties Country and the lives of his loyall subjects, to the barbarous heathen.

4.For haveing, protected, favoured, and Imboldned the Indians against his Majesties loyall subjects, never contriveing, requireing, or appointing any due or proper meanes of sattisfaction for theire many Invasions, robbories, and murthers comitted upon us.

5.For haveing when the Army of English, was just upon the track of those Indians, who now in all places burne, spoyle, murther and when we might with ease have distroyed them: who then were in open hostillity, for then haveing expressly countermanded, and sent back our Army, by passing his word for the peaceable demeanour of the said Indians, who imediately prosecuted theire evill intentions, comitting horred murthers and robberies in all places, being protected by the said ingagement and word past of him the said Sir William Berkeley, haveing ruined and laid desolate a greate part of his Majesties Country, and have now drawne themselves into such obscure and remote places, and are by theire success soe imboldned and confirmed, by theire confederacy soe strengthned that the cryes of blood are in all places, and the terror, and constimation of the peOple soe greate, are now become, not onely a difficult, but a very formidable enimy, who might att first with ease have beene distroyed.

6.And lately when upon the loud outcryes of blood the Assembly had with all care raised and framed an Army for the preventing of further mischeife and safeguard of this his Majesties Colony.

7.For haveing with onely the privacy of some few favorites, without acquainting the people, onely by the alteracon of a figure, forged a Comission, by we know not what hand, not onely without, but even against the consent of the people, for the raiseing and effecting civill warr and distruction, which being happily and without blood shed prevented, for haveing the second time attempted the same, thereby calling downe our forces from the defence of the fronteeres and most weekely expoased places.

8.For the prevencon of civill mischeife and ruin amongst ourselves, whilst the barbarous enimy in all places did invade, murther and spoyle us, his majesties most faithfull subjects.
Of this and the aforesaid Articles we accuse Sir William Berkeley as guilty of each and every one of the same, and as one who hath traiterously attempted, violated and Injured his Majesties interest here, by a loss of a greate part of this his Colony and many of his faithfull loyall subjects, by him betrayed and in a barbarous and shamefull manner expoased to the Incursions and murther of the heathen, And we doe further declare these the ensueing persons in this list, to have beene his wicked and pernicious councellours Confederates, aiders, and assisters against the Comonality in these our Civill comotions.

Sir Henry Chichley         William Claiburne Junior

Lieut. Coll. Christopher   Thomas Hawkins

Wormeley                   William Sherwood

Phillip Ludwell            John Page Clerke

Robert Beverley            John Cluffe Clerke

Richard Lee                John West

Thomas Ballard             Hubert Farrell

William Cole               Thomas Reade

Richard Whitacre           Matthew Kempe

Nicholas Spencer

Joseph Bridger

And we doe further demand that the said Sir William Berkeley with all the persons in this list be forthwith delivered up or surrender themselves within fower days after the notice hereof, Or otherwise we declare as followeth.

That in whatsoever place, howse, or ship, any of the said persons shall reside, be hidd, or protected, we declaire the owners, Masters or Inhabitants of the said places, to be confederates and trayters to the people and the estates of them is alsoe of all the aforesaid persons to be confiscated, and this we the Comons of Virginia doe declare, desiering a firme union amongst our selves that we may joyntly and with one accord defend our selves against the common Enimy, and lett not the faults of the guilty be the reproach of the inocent, or the faults or crimes of the oppressours devide and separate us who have suffered by theire oppressions.

These are therefore in his majesties name to command you forthwith to seize the persons above mentioned as Trayters to the King and Country and them to bring to Midle plantacon, and there to secure them untill further order, and in case of opposition, if you want any further assistance you are forthwith to demand itt in the name of the people in all the Counties of Virginia.
Nathaniel Bacon
Generall by Consent of the people.

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Published in: on January 24, 2010 at 6:20 am  Comments Off  
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